• Minnesota Speeding Ticket Laws

    Speeding Tickets in Minnesota


    Fighting a Speeding Ticket in Minnesota

    Minnesota Points Fines Reciprocity and Other Issues


    Absolute Speed Limits in Minnesota


    Absolute speed limits are the posted speed limits that are on signs on the road. In Minnesota, there are different maximum speed limits depending on the type of road. The maximum speed limits are 10 miles per hour in an alley, 30 miles per hour in an urban district, 70 miles per hour on interstate highways that are located outside of an urbanized area with a population of greater than 50,000, and 65 miles per hour on interstate highways that are located inside the limits of any urbanized area with a population of greater than 50,000. The speed limit on noninterstate expressways is 65 miles per hour.

    In addition, the speed limit is 25 miles per hour in residential roadways if adopted by the road authority having jurisdiction over the residential roadway and 35 miles per hour in a rural residential district if adopted by the road authority that has proper jurisdiction. On other roads in Minnesota that do not fall under any of these classifications, the maximum speed limit is 55 miles per hour.

    Presumed Speed Limits in Minnesota


    In addition to the maximum speed limits motorists must follow in Minnesota, there is a presumed speed limit in the state. A presumed speed limit is not based on the speeds found on signs located along a road or highway. Instead, a presumed speed limit takes factors such as road and weather conditions into account to determine whether a particular speed is safe. Minnesota's presumed speed limit law reads "no person shall drive a vehicle on a highway at a speed greater than is reasonable and prudent under the conditions. Every driver is responsible for becoming and remaining aware of the actual and potential hazards then existing on the highway and must use due care in operating a vehicle. In every event speed shall be so restricted as may be necessary to avoid colliding with any person, vehicle, or other conveyance on or entering the highway in compliance with legal requirements and the duty of all persons to use due care." Conditions that may require reduced speed include approaching a railroad crossing, approaching an emergency vehicle with its lights flashing, driving in snow or rain, driving around a curve, driving up a hill, or driving on a narrow or winding roadway. Special hazards caused by pedestrians, traffic, weather, or road conditions may require reduced speeds.

    Slow Driving in Minnesota


    Driving a vehicle at a very slow speed can also be dangerous. In Minnesota, minimum speeds may be required on certain highways. The commissioner of transportation may erect signs specifying the minimum speed on such a highway. This can be the case if an engineering investigation reveals that a minimum speed is necessary for the reasonable and safe use of a highway. Any speed that is below the stated minimum is unlawful.
    In Minnesota, a person may not drive a vehicle on a highway at a speed that is greater than what is reasonable and prudent under the conditions and every driver is responsible for being aware of the actual and potential hazards then existing on the highway. Drivers must use due care in operating a vehicle and speed must be restricted as necessary to avoid collisions with any person, vehicle, or other conveyance that is on the roadway. The maximum speed limits are 10 miles per hour in an alley, 30 miles per hour in an urban district, 70 miles per hour on interstate highways located outside of an urbanized area with a population greater than 50,000, and 65 miles per hour on interstate highways that are located inside of an urbanized area with a population of greater than 50,000. The speed limit is 65 miles per hour on noninterstate expressways.
    The speed limit is 25 miles per hour in residential roadways if adopted by the road authority that has jurisdiction over the residential roadway and 35 miles per hour in a rural residential district if adopted by the road authority that has proper jurisdiction. On other roads in Minnesota that do not fall under any of these classifications, the speed limit is 55 miles per hour. The speed limit is increased by ten miles per hour over the posted speed limit when the driver is overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction of travel.

    There are circumstances that may require reduced speed in order for a driver to be considered as having met the reasonable and prudent standard of due care. These situations include things like approaching a railroad crossing, driving in snow or rain, driving around a curve, driving up a hill, or driving on a narrow or winding roadway. Special hazards caused by pedestrians or other traffic may also require reduced speeds. In addition, local authorities in Minnesota may establish a school speed limit within a school zone of a public or nonpublic school upon the basis of an engineering and traffic investigation as ordered by the commissioner of transportation. Such school zone speed limits are effective during the school day and cannot be lower than 15 miles per hour. There may also be reduced maximum speed limits on highway work zones. The minimum highway work zone speed limit is 20 miles per hour.
    Certain roads or highways in Minnesota may require motorists to drive at a certain minimum speed. If an engineering and traffic investigation reveals that a minimum speed is necessary for the reasonable and safe use of any highway, the commissioner may erect appropriate signs specifying what the minimum speed is.

    Speed Trap Law in Minnesota


    There is no speed trap law in Minnesota. Speed traps are legal in the state.

    Elements of a Speeding Charge in Minnesota


    The elements of a speeding charge are all the things that the prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt for a person to be found guilty of speeding in the state of Minnesota. The elements that must be proved are identity, operation, vehicle, and that the driver was going at a speed that violated the law. The speed indicated by law enforcement must be over the speed limit or constitute a violation of a driver's duty to use due care because the driver did not act reasonably or prudently under the conditions. Identity, operation, and vehicle mean that the person charged with speeding was the actual driver of the vehicle that was speeding in violation of the law. The alleged speed must also be accurate information. A defendant cannot be convicted of speeding in Minnesota if the prosecution does not prove these elements beyond a reasonable doubt.

    In Minnesota, there are two ways that a person can commit the offense of speeding. The first is by driving a vehicle in a manner that is not reasonable or prudent given the conditions. Such driving violates the legal requirement of due care. A driver must restrict speed as necessary in order to avoid collisions and must drive at a speed that is not greater than what is reasonable and prudent under the conditions. The second way a driver can commit the offense of speeding in Minnesota is by driving at a speed that exceeds the maximum speed limit. Maximum speed limits in Minnesota vary according to the type of road that one is driving on. The burden of proof in a speeding case is on the prosecution and the standard is beyond a reasonable doubt.

    Speeding Limits for Commercial Vehicles in Minnesota


    Speed limits are the same in Minnesota for both commercial vehicles and other vehicles. Minnesota Statute 169.14 makes no distinction between commercial vehicles and other vehicles when it comes to the speed limits that the statute imposes. There is no stricter speed limit that applies to commercial vehicles. However, there are stricter penalties for speeding violations. Speeding 15 miles per hour or over with a Commercial Drivers License can bring serious consequences for a driver. Speeding 15 miles per hour or more with a CDL in Minnesota can lead to a driver receiving fines and, in some cases, even a license suspension or CDL revocation. Any driver with a CDL in Minnesota that speeds 15 miles per hour or more over the speed limit can expect a fine of up to $200. Any violation that involves speeding of 15 miles per hour or more over the speed limit is a serious violation on a CDL. Such a speeding violation is deemed serious based on 383.51 of the Code of Federal Regulations. If a driver has 2 serious violations in a 3 year period, their CDL will be suspended for 60 days. The CDL will be suspended for 120 days if a driver with a CDL is convicted of three serious violations over a 3 year period. The speed limits in Minnesota are the same for CDL drivers but the penalties for speeding can be harsher and more severe.
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