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  1. How to file a Provisional Application for Patent for $125

    by , 10-31-2012 at 02:34 AM
    So you have an invention and you want to patent it and are thinking it will cost thousands of dollars so you do nothing..
    Then, if 2 years you see the EXACT same thing in Costco and curse yourself for not moving forward when you knew you should have.

    Think the US Government wants you to pay LOTS in Taxes? Well.. they do and this is EXACTLY why the US Patent office provides the Provisional Application for Patent, PPA, that lets you file a PPA for $125. They will let you play ...
  2. How to File a Patent for $125 on your own... Can it REALLY be done?

    by , 09-25-2012 at 11:28 PM
    OK.. Not really.. What I REALLY mean to say is you can file a Provisional Application for Patent, PPA, with the USPTO for $125.

    Visit this video based help page, shown in Yahoo Answers, that shows HOW to Patent Your Invention with the Provisional Application for Patent

    What this gives you is the coveted "Patent Pending" that the investors in "Shark Tank" insist on your having BEFORE they will entertain working with you. The reason they INSIST on ...
  3. Patent On The Cheap with the US Provisional Application for Patent for just $125

    by , 07-25-2012 at 06:13 PM
    Nearly every single person I know says at one time or another that they have or had, an invention. Some say they had an invention only to find out, years later, that someone "copied" their invention. Nope.. they just took action...

    The MAIN reason most of those folks do not take action to actually file a patent is they think it is too expensive to file a patent. What they do not realize is the Federal U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, USPTO, was "forced" by Congress ...
  4. Legal Blogging Liability FAQs

    by , 07-06-2012 at 04:59 PM


    This Legal Blogging Liability Overview is a set of FAQs which addresses common blogging issues of a legal nature which could affect your writing as a blogger, publisher, and most importantly in situations where you may have been sued or face some type of legal action regarding to information published on your blog.

    What do I do if I am sued for something that I blogged?

    Contact a good attorney (If you don't have an attorney already, or need help finding one, ...
  5. Obtaining Legal Help for Theft of Intellectual Property

    by , 03-29-2012 at 08:23 AM
    [B]First, What does Intellectual Property Refer to?
    [/B][COLOR=#000000][FONT=Times New Roman]
    Intellectual property is defined to include original works created by a single individual or also including groups. Some examples are original music, artwork, as well as books and other forms of writing. These are all types of intellectual property which have inherent ownership by their creator or creators. A company’s logo, product(s')' names, or their company name itself are intellectual property. ...

    Updated 03-29-2012 at 08:26 AM by Goran Tepshic (fixing typos)

    Categories
    Intellectual Property , Copyrights
  6. Overview of Copyright Protection Law

    by , 08-24-2011 at 02:01 AM
    Copyright protection applies to any original work of authorship, fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Copyright law does not protect functional aspects of works as that falls to patent law. Copyright law cannot be used to protect any work of the United States Government, i.e. NASA pictures, Supreme Court opinions, or Navy battle plans. Any work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s duties may not be copyrighted. Unlike patent law, here it ...
  7. Overview of Copyright Law

    by , 08-19-2011 at 12:46 AM
    Copyright protection applies to any original work of authorship, fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Copyright law does not protect functional aspects of works as that falls to patent law. Copyright law cannot be used to protect any work of the United States Government, i.e. NASA pictures, Supreme Court opinions, or Navy battle plans. Any work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s duties may not be copyrighted. Unlike patent law, here it ...
  8. Copyright Frequently Asked Questions

    by , 08-19-2011 at 12:32 AM
    1) What is a copyright?

    A copyright gives a person ownership over the thing he/she creates. They cover literary works such as books, paintings, computer software, etc…. A copyright does not cover facts, ideas, processes (ex: directions or recipes), or unfixes works (ex: a “jam session” which isn’t recorded). Having a copyright gives the creator the right to control it.

    The creator/author is in charge of the reproduction, distribution, and adaptation of the work. ...