seasonal employee

This is a discussion on seasonal employee within the Employment and Labor Law Questions forums, part of the Legal Questions & Answers Forum category; I work as a seasonal employee for a major national company in Connecticut. I have been there for 7 years. Typical seasons run from Sept-Dec and March-June. They do also ...

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  1. #1
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    seasonal employee

    I work as a seasonal employee for a major national company in Connecticut. I have been there for 7 years. Typical seasons run from Sept-Dec and March-June. They do also have a few year round employees. Seasonal employees are laid off in between seasons and then called back when business picks up. This past fall season the company hired several new seasonal people. This new spring season that just started, the new hires have been called back to work before and in some cases instead of the seasonals who have been there for years. Is this legal? At the very least it seems unethical. Also at the end of this past fall season, we were told by a manager that in deciding who to call back they look at how much $ each makes and those who make less will be called back first. Should we then turn down raises in order to have more of a chance of getting called back?

    Last edited by anonymous1; 03-10-2012 at 06:41 PM.

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    What is illegal or unethical about what they are doing? An employer can do what he wishes so long as it doesn't violate any law. Whether you decide to work for less money in the hopes of being called back to work is a personal decision, but an employer has the right to hire people are willing to accept less money to perform the job.
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  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply.

    At every review you are praised for what a great job you do, they give you a raise and then at the end of the season they let you know you may not come back because you make too much money. So maybe not unethical or illegal, but it is sad. Why not offer the people they already have to work for less? I could not treat people like that. Building false hope with praise, then shutting you out of opportunities.

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    Agreed that it may not be the right way to do business, but is not illegal. Some people care about money more than they do about other people.
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    Still mulling this over. Are they not 'discriminating' against me if they are the ones who set the pay rate/raises and then refuse to take me back because I make too much money?

    Sorry to keep going on and on. Can you tell I am a little bitter about this?

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    1. That is not discrimination. 2. Even if that was discrimination, only certain types of discrimination is protected against. For example, say a landlord refuses to rent you an apartment because of your race. That is illegal discrimination because race is a protected class. However, if the landlord refuses to rent you an apartment because you are a lawyer (and lawyers as tenants could be a hassle), that is not discrimination because occupation is not a protected class.
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