Almost two years ago I wrote here about the concept of the "digital afterlife," and what people who devote time, energy and money to their "digital selves" can do to plan for the time when they are dead and gone. That post referenced blogs and other online assets, but did not consider one digital asset that has since surged in prominence: social media accounts, and particularly Facebook accounts. The Associated Press reports that in Nebraska and Oklahoma, lawmakers are taking that issue into their own hands with legislation that makes a person's Facebook and other social network accounts part of their "digital estate" upon their death. Oklahoma was the first state to pass such a law. Under the Oklahoma law, friends or relatives are authorized to take control of social media and email accounts if the deceased person lived in the state. Ryan Kiesel, who wrote the Oklahoma law, told the AP that while existing law adequately addressed how to distribute things like mementos and shoeboxes with photos, it did not contemplate personal photos and other items on Facebook accounts. "We wanted to get state law and attorneys to begin thinking about the digital estate," he said. Presently, Facebook's policy...

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