As discussed here, last month the Court of Appeals of Maryland held that pit bulls as a breed are "inherently dangerous," thus eliminating the need for a plaintiff injured by a pit bull to show that the owner had actual knowledge that the specific pit bull involved was dangerous. The holding was a dramatic departure from the longstanding "one free bite" rule in Maryland and most states that provides that if your dog bites and injures another person and has never done anything like that before, you are not liable for those injuries because the law assumes that you had no knowledge that your dog was dangerous. The Maryland court's ruling has sparked a major backlash among dog rescue groups and, of course, pit bull owners, but also support from certain parents, groups and dog bite victims. CBS News reports that the Maryland SPCA disagrees with the ruling, and fears that it will lead to more pit bulls having to be "put down" instead of being adopted. The SPCA says it is nurture, not nature that gives the breed a bad reputation. "Every animal is an individual, so to say that all pit bulls are inherently dangerous is absolutely untrue,"...

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