In the August issue of the ABA Journal, Deborah Cohen has an interesting article on some of the pros and cons of being an adjunct professor at a law school. As someone who has served as an adjunct professor of Legal Writing not once but twice (both times at George Mason University School of Law, separated by about a decade in between), I believe Cohen's article is pretty accurate. As the article suggests, there is at least a whiff of "prestige" associated with being offered a position as an adjunct law professor that makes it seems like a great idea at the time. Cool, I'll be "Professor Carton!" I'll get paid to share my wisdom with law students! The class is only two hours per week, that can't be too much work, right? All of this is true, but there is more to the equation that makes the decision on being an adjunct professor a bit more tricky. First, the compensation. As Cohen notes, the pay is pretty minimal -- about $1,000 per credit hour, she reports. Basically you can expect to receive just a few thousand dollars per semester for your efforts as an adjunct. Second, part-time teaching as...

More...