Back in my day, if you bought a refrigerator and had it delivered to your home, only to find that it didn't refrigerate properly, you were at the mercy of the company to come to your house and replace it. In the social media era, that is still pretty much the case, as criminal defense lawyer and blogger Scott Greenfield has learned the hard way over the past couple months. However, in the year 2011, social media such as Twitter can an at least provide an aggrieved consumer, his broken appliance, and their collective Twitter followers with a way to apply some pressure on a company to make things right. To make a very long story short, this summer Greenfield ordered a KitchenAid refrigerator. He quickly realized that try as it might, his refrigerator was unable to get to the standard temperature of 37 degrees -- 44 degrees cool was all that it could muster. Over Greenfield's objections, KitchenAid unsuccessfully tried to repair his newly installed refrigerator (he wanted a new one). Greenfield ultimately received an email that (a) blamed the refrigerator's cooling problem on the "ambient temperature" of Greenfield's house, and (b) essentially told him he would get nothing...

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